Daily Gains Letter

budget deficit


Government to Run Budget Deficits Until 2038; How Can Money Printing Stop?

By for Daily Gains Letter | Nov 4, 2013

Budget Deficit Until 2038The stock market is certainly getting all the attention these days, but not a lot is said about other disturbing fundamentals. These fundamentals are troublesome, and if they aren’t fixed, the U.S. economy could end up in a downward spiral in a very short period of time. With these conditions, those who are saving and investing for the long term can face a significant amount of scrutiny.

I’m talking about the U.S. national debt and the U.S. government posting another budget deficit.

When someone goes to get a loan, the bank usually asks how much in assets the person has or what their credit score is; this way, the bank can judge their ability to pay back the loan. If a person has a significant amount of debt already and a bad credit score, then banks will be hesitant to give them anything. There’s no rocket science behind this; the chances of a person with bad credit and a lot of debt defaulting on their liabilities are very high.

When I look at the U.S. economy, I see something very similar and wonder if those who are buying U.S. bonds, thereby giving loans to the U.S. economy, will one day say, “No, we will not give you any money.”

You see, since the financial crisis, the U.S. government has been registering a massive budget deficit. For example, in fiscal 2012, the U.S. government posted a budget deficit of over $1.0 trillion. In fiscal 2013, the U.S. government registered a budget deficit of $680 billion—slightly lower than the preceding years, but a deficit nonetheless. (Source: “Final Monthly Treasury Statement of Receipts … Read More


How the Debt Fiasco Will End for Long-Term Investors

By for Daily Gains Letter | Sep 24, 2013

Long-Term InvestorsThe financial crisis struck the U.S. economy five years ago. Those who remember the collapse of Lehman Brothers know how much uncertainty was actually there. It seemed the U.S. economy was going to halt and the financial system would collapse. Ripples across the global economy were felt. Nothing looked safe—it was a total bloodbath. Investors had many questions, including if they would be able to protect their nest eggs.

As a result of all this, to fight the uncertainty and handle the issues at hand, the U.S. government and the central bank jumped in and started to spend. They bailed out the big banks in the U.S. economy to make sure everything would continue to run smoothly. We passed through that successfully, and the worst didn’t come upon us.

Sadly, as all this happened, we saw troubling trends starting to form in the U.S. economy.

Look at the national debt.

As the government started to rev up its spending spree, it posted a budget deficit and eventually borrowed money. To give you some idea, in January of 2008, when the behemoth was starting to awaken, the national debt of the U.S. economy stood at $9.2 trillion. Fast-forwarding to now, it stands at $16.7 trillion. Simple math suggests this is an increase of more than 81%. (Source: “The Daily History of the Debt Results,” Treasury Direct web site, last accessed September 20, 2013.)

Unfortunately, it doesn’t end here. Not too long ago, Treasury secretary Jack Lew sent a letter to the U.S. government saying that if they don’t increase the national debt limit currently in place by October, the U.S. economy … Read More


How to Stop Inflation from Burning a Hole in Your Retirement Savings

By for Daily Gains Letter | Aug 12, 2013

Stop Inflation from Burning American investors are sitting on a lot of money. According to the Investment Company Institute, total U.S. money market mutual fund assets for the week ended July 31 came in at $2.612 trillion. Of that total, 65%, or $1.69336 trillion, is attributed to institutional investors, while $918.93 billion belongs to retail investors. (Source: “Money Market Mutual Fund Assets,” ICI.org, August 1, 2013.)

Even though the stock market has been bullish since early 2009, with the S&P 500 advancing around 140%, investors sitting on the sideline remain skeptical. And on one hand, it’s not hard to see why: the financial crisis that led to the Great Recession may have started back in 2007, but the ripple effects are still being felt today.

U.S. unemployment has been above seven percent for over four years, underemployment has been at least 14% since 2009, and the minimum wage hasn’t budged from $7.25 an hour since July 2009. On top of that, personal debt is up, disposable income is a myth, and consumer confidence is down.

Hints that the Federal Reserve could begin tapering its $85.0-billion-per-month bond-buying program have also made global investors jittery, resulting in markets that are increasingly volatile—and for good reason.

On May 22, the Federal Reserve hinted it might scale back its quantitative easing policy. Over the following weeks, the S&P 500 lost 6.5% of its value. After clawing back the losses throughout July, the S&P 500 took another hit in early August after two Federal Reserve Bank presidents said it was possible the bond-buying program could end in September.

For many Americans, risk in the stock and bond markets is … Read More